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FEBRUARY


Thursday, February 22 I 7:30-9:30pm

The Native American Staff Council presents:

A Documentary Film Screening of "100 Years: One Woman's Fight for Justice" (Elouise Cobell's inspiring story)

Followed by Q&A with Director and Producer, Melinda Janko

  • When Elouise began asking questions about missing money from government managed Indian Trust accounts, she never imagined that one day she would be taking on the world’s most powerful government.  As the Treasurer of her tribe, she discovered a trail of fraud and corruption leading all the way from Montana to Washington, D.C.         
  • 100 YEARS:  ONE WOMAN’S FIGHT FOR JUSTICE is the story of her 30-year fight for justice for 300,000 Native Americans whose mineral rich lands were grossly mismanaged by the United States Government.  In 1996, Cobell filed the largest class action lawsuit ever filed against the federal government.  For 15 long years, and through three Presidential administrations, Elouise Cobell’s unrelenting spirit never quit.  This is the compelling true story of how she prevailed and made history for a $3.4 billion settlement.  The film not only details her bravery and long fight but serves as a fitting tribute to a warrior unlike any other.

 

West Pauley Ballroom, Martin Luther King Jr. Student Union, UC Berkeley (2475 Bancroft Way)

Admission is FREE but attendees must RSVP to the American Indian Graduate Program - aigp@berkeley.edu by Wednesday, February 14, 2018 or call (510) 642-3228 and provide names and emails of guests. All students, staff, faculty, alumni and the public are welcome! Reserve your space early as seating may go fast! After the talk, completed evaluations will be entered to win great raffle prizes!

Co-sponsored by: Chancellor Carol Christ, Office of the Chancellor; Jo Mackness, Human Resources; Oscar Dubon and Sidalia Reel, Equity & Inclusion; American Indian Graduate Student Association; American Indian Graduate Program; and Native American Studies, and the Joseph A. Myers Center for Research on Native American Issues. 

If you have questions, please contact Carmen Foghorn (carmenf@berkeley.edu) or Cindy Andallo (candallo@berkeley.edu), 510-642-3228.


Wednesday, February 28 I 12:00-1:30pm

Crossing Paths: Graduate & Undergraduate Exchanges of Indigenous Research 

Started in 2013, the Crossing Paths lecture series provides a space for Native and Indigenous graduate and undergraduate students to share their research, get feedback, and build community with other students, faculty, staff, and allies. Each Crossing Paths meeting consists of two student presenters (an undergraduate and a graduate), a moderator ( a faculty or staff person), and audience discussion.

Speakers TBA

554 Barrows Hall

Co-sponsored by the Joseph A. Myers Center for Research on Native American Issues, American Indian Graduate Student AssociationAmerican Indian Graduate Program, Native American Studies, Native American Student DevelopmentNative American Recruitment and Retention CenterGraduate Assembly, and the ASUC


MARCH


Thursday, March 1 | 4:00-5:30 pm

California Through Native Eyes: Reclaiming History

William J. Bauer, Jr., Professor, Department of History, University of Nevada, Las Vegas

In 1935, Concow Austin McLaine, of northern California’s Round Valley Reservation, told an oral tradition about Lizard, who saw smoke wafting up from West Mountain, now known as Lassen Peak. The people in Lizard’s town planned to steal fire from Eagle, who selfishly kept the fire under his wings. The people teamed up, stole the fire, and raced with it back to town. Before they reached their roundhouse, however, Coyote grabbed the fire, dropped it and set the entire Sacramento Valley ablaze. Traditionally, scholars have treated oral traditions, such as the story of Lizard, as quaint myths. This presentation argues that California Indian oral traditions present an Indigenous version of California’s history and engaged in the political events of the Great Depression. California Indians used their oral traditions to challenge preexisting narratives of California’s past, to claim land and place in the 1930s and provide California Indians with a path to follow in the future. 

Followed by a reception.

Multicultural Community Center (MCC), 220 Martin Luther King Jr. Student Union, UC Berkeley

Sponsor: Joseph A. Myers Center for Research on Native American Issues

Wednesday, March 28 I 12:00-1:30pm

Crossing Paths: Graduate & Undergraduate Exchanges of Indigenous Research 

Started in 2013, the Crossing Paths lecture series provides a space for Native and Indigenous graduate and undergraduate students to share their research, get feedback, and build community with other students, faculty, staff, and allies. Each Crossing Paths meeting consists of two student presenters (an undergraduate and a graduate), a moderator ( a faculty or staff person), and audience discussion.

Speakers TBA

554 Barrows Hall

Co-sponsored by the Joseph A. Myers Center for Research on Native American Issues, American Indian Graduate Student AssociationAmerican Indian Graduate Program, Native American Studies, Native American Student DevelopmentNative American Recruitment and Retention CenterGraduate Assembly, and the ASUC


APRIL


Wednesday, April 25 I 12:00-1:30pm

Crossing Paths: Graduate & Undergraduate Exchanges of Indigenous Research 

Started in 2013, the Crossing Paths lecture series provides a space for Native and Indigenous graduate and undergraduate students to share their research, get feedback, and build community with other students, faculty, staff, and allies. Each Crossing Paths meeting consists of two student presenters (an undergraduate and a graduate), a moderator ( a faculty or staff person), and audience discussion.

Speakers TBA

554 Barrows Hall

Co-sponsored by the Joseph A. Myers Center for Research on Native American Issues, American Indian Graduate Student AssociationAmerican Indian Graduate Program, Native American Studies, Native American Student DevelopmentNative American Recruitment and Retention CenterGraduate Assembly, and the ASUC


 

 

Joseph A. Myers Center for Research on Native American Issue
The Myers Center is part of the Institute for the Study of Societal Issues 
2420 Bowditch Street #5670
University of California
Berkeley, CA 94720-5670
TEL: 510.643.7237
FAX: 510.642.8674
crnai@berkeley.edu
 
 

 

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