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MYERS CENTER FIRST-OF-ITS KIND MUSEUM STUDIES INSTITUTE IN THE NEWS

On January 10-13, 2012, the Myers Center, in collaboration with the Phoebe A. Heart Museum of Anthropology at UC Berkeley and the California Indian Museum and Cultural Center, hosted a Native American Museum Studies Institute. The Institute, which was open to the public, provided participants with training and instruction in collections management, collections care and conservation, curation and exhibit design, educational programming, museum management and fundraising, and the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA).  The goal of the Institute was to develop the capacity of tribal community members to: conserve and revitalize tribal cultural heritage, foster tribal representations and partnerships, and educate tribal and non-tribal communities through museum development and exhibits.

"The need to conserve and revitalize tribal cultural heritage, and give tribes a stronger voice in representing that heritage, was the beating heart of the institute. In addition to workshops on topics like collections management and cataloging — including a day at the Hearst’s basket and textile storage facility in Emeryville — participants were schooled in such issues as the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act, better known as NAGPRA, the 1990 law that requires institutions receiving federal funding to return human remains and other cultural objects to tribes." Read more - from the UC Berkeley New Center's story about the Institute - here.

 


"A CENTURY LATER, ISHI STILL HAS LESSONS TO TEACH"

"A Century of Ishi: A One Day Conference Celebrating 100 Years of Ishi" was held on Wednesday, September 7, from 9:00am to 4:30pm at the Clark Kerr Campus at UC Berkeley.  This one day conference honored the contributions of Ishi as an educator and cultural ambassador and provided an opportunity to reflect on contemporary interpretations of his legacy and of the Native American experience in museums.  This event was organized by the Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology and the California Indian Museum & Cultural Center.  The Joseph A. Myers Center for Research on Native Americans was pleased to co-sponsor this event.  Read more about this conference here.

 


JOSEPH A. MYERS IS 2010 RECIPIENT OF THE PETER E. HAAS PUBLIC SERVICE AWARD

Joseph A. Myers has been selected to be the 2010 recipient of The Peter E. Haas Public Service Award.  The Award was established by Mrs. Peter E. Haas on the occasion of her husband's 80th birthday. Its purpose is to honor an alumnus of the University of California, Berkeley who, through his or her personal efforts, has made a significant voluntary public contribution within the boundaries of the United States. The focus is on four major areas: community service, health care, environmental work, and education. The award seeks to recognize activity at the grassroots level and illustrate the impact that an individual can have on society through creative social change.  For more information visit http://urel.berkeley.edu/haasawards.

Mr. Myers has contributed significantly to the improvement of justice and the quality of life in Indian country. For the past 20 years, he has lectured in Native American Studies at Berkeley. In 1993, Myers received national recognition from Attorney General Janet Reno for his work on behalf of victims of crime in Indian country. In 2002, the California Wellness Foundation awarded Myers the California Peace Prize for his work in violence prevention on Indian reservations. Additionally, he is a founder and board member of the California Indian Museum and Cultural Center. Since 2002, Myers has served as chairperson of Caltrans' Native American Advisory Committee. Mr. Myers will be recognized by the Chancellor at an award ceremony on Monday, May 2, 2011.

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