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Center Events

February 2017

Wednesday, February 22

12:00-1:30pm

Crossing Paths: Graduate & Undergraduate Exchanges of Indigenous Research

"Liminal Objects of Settler Encounters: Metal Gorgets and Indigenous Reclamation of the Colonial Past in Australia"

Anya Montiel, PhD Candidate, American Studies, Yale University

"PostIndian Simulations: Trickster Theory in the Work of Gerald Vizenor"

Dominique Althoff, undergraduate, Native American Studies, UC Berkeley

554 Barrows Hall

Co-sponsored by the Joseph A. Myers Center for Research on Native American Issues, American Indian Graduate Student Association, American Indian Graduate Program, Native American Studies, Native American Student Development, Native American Recruitment and Retention Center, Graduate Assembly, and the ASUC

Thursday, February 23

4:00-5:30pm

CRNAI Colloquia Series:

* DUE TO UNFORSEEN CIRCUMSTANCES THIS EVENT HAS BEEN CANCELLED *

Crime and Governance in Indian Country

Angela Riley, Professor of Law, Director of Native Nations Law and Policy Center, UCLA School of Law

Criminal jurisdiction in Indian country is defined by a central, ironic paradox. Recent federal laws expanding tribal criminal jurisdiction are, in many respects, enormous victories for Indian country, as they acknowledge and reify a more robust notion of tribal sovereignty, one capable of accommodating increased tribal control over safety and security on Indian reservations. At the same time, the laws make clear that sovereignty comes at a price, potentially working to effectuate further assimilation of tribal courts and Indian people. As a result, at the same time that tribal sovereignty gains ground in ways critical to autonomy and self-governance, it is simultaneously threatened by exogenous forces that have the potential to homogenize tribal justice systems legally, politically, and—in particular—culturally. 

This talk will present the first comprehensive assessment of the Tribal Law and Order Act and the reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act, respectively, to show how they relate to one another on the ground and the implications for tribal sovereignty and self-determination. Ultimately, based on data compiled for the first time as well as extensive secondary sources, I argue that expanded criminal jurisdiction and punishment authority have, perhaps paradoxically, enhanced the ability of tribes to develop and enforce policies, laws, and procedures that are consistent with tribal custom and tradition. This presents a unique opportunity worthy of further exploration. In other words, rather than sovereignty and assimilation expanding in tension with one another, I find that the application of the laws has been experienced in tribal communities, as least anecdotally and preliminarily, as greatly enhancing—not threatening or destroying— tribal sovereignty and Indian cultural survival.

* DUE TO UNFORSEEN CIRCUMSTANCES THIS EVENT HAS BEEN CANCELLED *

Wildavsky Conference Room, ISSI, 2538 Channing Way

Co-sponsored by the Thelton E. Henderson Center for Social Justice, American Indian Graduate Program, American Indian Graduate Student Association, Native American Student Development, and Native American Studies Program, UC Berkeley

March 2017

Thursday, March 9

12:00-1:00pm

Graduate Fellows Program presents:

2017-18 Graduate Fellows Program Application Workshop

In its forty years of existence, the Graduate Fellows Program (GFP) has provided an interdisciplinary research and training environment as a complement to, and resource for, UC Berkeley graduate programs in the social sciences and professional schools. Over 150 UC Berkeley graduate students have completed their doctoral studies and gone on to distinguished academic careers that have significantly influenced their disciplines and fields on issues of social change and inequality.

In an expansion of the Graduate Fellows Program, the Joseph A. Myers Center for Research on Native American Issues will provide funding for one additional Berkeley doctoral student who has completed at least three years of graduate studies and whose research focuses on Native American issues in the US today.

GFP Training Coordinators, Dr. David Minkus and Dr. Deborah Lustig, will provide an overview of the application process, the criteria applied when evaluating applicants, and the content and organization of the Graduate Fellows Program. Attending the workshop is not required.

For more information and to download an application click here.

Troy Duster Conference Room, 2420 Bowditch Street

Wednesday, March 22

12:00-1:30pm

Crossing Paths: Graduate & Undergraduate Exchanges of Indigenous Research

"Biologizing Authenticity: The perpetual return of the partial Indian"

Meredith Palmer, PhD Candidate, Geography, UC Berkeley

"Defending Real Property: Indigenous Landholding after Imperial Treaties in Quebec, Louisiana, and California, 1763-1863"

Julia Lewandoski, PhD Candidate, History, UC Berkeley

554 Barrows Hall

Co-sponsored by the Joseph A. Myers Center for Research on Native American Issues, American Indian Graduate Student Association, American Indian Graduate Program, Native American Studies, Native American Student Development, Native American Recruitment and Retention Center, Graduate Assembly, and the ASUC

APril 2017

Thursday, April 13

4:00-5:30pm

ISSI Graduate Fellows Seminar Series:

Braiding Knowledge: Opportunities and Perils of Community-Based Research and Activist Scholarship with Indigenous Communities

Sonya Atalay, Associate Professor of Anthropology, UMass, Amherst

Kojun "Jun" Ueno Sunseri, Ph.D., RPA, Assistant Professor, Archaeological Research Facility, UC Berkeley as a respondent 

A commitment to decolonization requires fundamental shifts in the way we make, teach, and share new knowledge. Transforming research from an extractive or exploitative endeavor toward a practice that contributes to healing and community-well being is one of the key challenges of our time for those in the academy today.  Drawing on multiple recent archaeology and heritage-related projects carried out in partnership with Native American and Turkish communities, Professor Atalay will share the exciting possibilities of community-based research practices along with the complexities, contradictions, and impediments involved in doing engaged and activist scholarship. From complex ethical dilemmas and our need for revised IRB processes, to enhancing our skill sets in collaborative, participatory planning and knowledge mobilization strategies - Atalay will discuss both the promise and perils involved in transforming research through a community-based approach.

Multicultural Community Center, MLK Jr. Student Union

Co-sponsored by Joseph A. Myers Center for Research on Native American Issues, American Indian Graduate Program, American Indian Graduate Student Association, Native American Student Development, Archeological Research Facility, UC Berkeley

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