Past Events

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SPRING 2017

Wednesday, February 22

12:00-1:30 PM

Crossing Paths: Graduate & Undergraduate Exchanges of Indigenous Research

"Liminal Objects of Settler Encounters: Metal Gorgets and Indigenous Reclamation of the Colonial Past in Australia"

Anya Montiel, PhD Candidate, American Studies, Yale University

"PostIndian Simulations: Trickster Theory in the Work of Gerald Vizenor"

Dominique Althoff, undergraduate, Native American Studies, UC Berkeley

554 Barrows Hall

Co-sponsored by the Joseph A. Myers Center for Research on Native American Issues, American Indian Graduate Student Association, American Indian Graduate Program, Native American Studies, Native American Student Development, Native American Recruitment and Retention Center, Graduate Assembly, and the ASUC

 

Thursday, March 9

12:00-1:00 PM

Graduate Fellows Program presents:

2017-18 Graduate Fellows Program Application Workshop

In its forty years of existence, the Graduate Fellows Program (GFP) has provided an interdisciplinary research and training environment as a complement to, and resource for, UC Berkeley graduate programs in the social sciences and professional schools. Over 150 UC Berkeley graduate students have completed their doctoral studies and gone on to distinguished academic careers that have significantly influenced their disciplines and fields on issues of social change and inequality.

In an expansion of the Graduate Fellows Program, the Joseph A. Myers Center for Research on Native American Issues will provide funding for one additional Berkeley doctoral student who has completed at least three years of graduate studies and whose research focuses on Native American issues in the US today.

GFP Training Coordinators, Dr. David Minkus and Dr. Deborah Lustig, will provide an overview of the application process, the criteria applied when evaluating applicants, and the content and organization of the Graduate Fellows Program. Attending the workshop is not required.

Troy Duster Conference Room, 2420 Bowditch Street

 

Wednesday, March 22

12:00-1:30pm

Crossing Paths: Graduate & Undergraduate Exchanges of Indigenous Research

"Biologizing Authenticity: The perpetual return of the partial Indian"

Meredith Palmer, PhD Candidate, Geography, UC Berkeley

"Defending Real Property: Indigenous Landholding after Imperial Treaties in Quebec, Louisiana, and California, 1763-1863"

Julia Lewandoski, PhD Candidate, History, UC Berkeley

554 Barrows Hall

Co-sponsored by the Joseph A. Myers Center for Research on Native American Issues, American Indian Graduate Student Association, American Indian Graduate Program, Native American Studies, Native American Student Development, Native American Recruitment and Retention Center, Graduate Assembly, and the ASUC

 

Thursday, April 13

4:00-5:30 PM

ISSI Graduate Fellows Seminar Series:

Braiding Knowledge: Opportunities and Perils of Community-Based Research and Activist Scholarship with Indigenous Communities

Sonya Atalay, Associate Professor of Anthropology, UMass, Amherst

Kojun "Jun" Ueno Sunseri, Ph.D., RPA, Assistant Professor, Anthropology, UC Berkeley as a respondent 

A commitment to decolonization requires fundamental shifts in the way we make, teach, and share new knowledge. Transforming research from an extractive or exploitative endeavor toward a practice that contributes to healing and community-well being is one of the key challenges of our time for those in the academy today.  Drawing on multiple recent archaeology and heritage-related projects carried out in partnership with Native American and Turkish communities, Professor Atalay will share the exciting possibilities of community-based research practices along with the complexities, contradictions, and impediments involved in doing engaged and activist scholarship. From complex ethical dilemmas and our need for revised IRB processes, to enhancing our skill sets in collaborative, participatory planning and knowledge mobilization strategies - Atalay will discuss both the promise and perils involved in transforming research through a community-based approach.

Multicultural Community Center, MLK Jr. Student Union

Co-sponsored by Joseph A. Myers Center for Research on Native American Issues, American Indian Graduate Program, American Indian Graduate Student Association, Native American Student Development, Archaeological Research Facility, UC Berkeley

 

Wednesday, April 19

12:00-1:30pm

Crossing Paths: Graduate & Undergraduate Exchanges of Indigenous Research

"A Glimmer of Hope: VAWA's Impact on Native Women and the Restoration of Tribal Sovereignty"

Reagan Haas, JD Candidate, UC Berkeley School of Law

"Honoring Ancestral Knowledge to Deconstruct the Colonial Environmental Paradigm"

Leke Hutchins, Undergraduate, Envoronmental Science major and Public Policy minor, UC Berkeley

554 Barrows Hall

Co-sponsored by the Joseph A. Myers Center for Research on Native American Issues, American Indian Graduate Student Association, American Indian Graduate Program, Native American Studies, Native American Student Development, Native American Recruitment and Retention Center, Graduate Assembly, and the ASUC

 

Thursday, April 27

3:30-5:00pm

North and South: Technologies of Order and Escape

Héctor Beltrán, Ph.D. Candidate, Department of Anthropology, Graduate Fellow, Institute for the Study of Societal Issues, UC Berkeley

Jen Smith, Ph.D. Candidate, Department of Ethnic Studies, and Graduate Fellow, Joseph A. Myers Center for Research on Native American Issues, UC Berkeley

with Keith P. Feldman, Assistant Professor, Department of Ethnic Studies, UC Berkeley as respondent

Héctor Beltrán | "Staging the Hackathon: Codeworlds and Code Work in Mexico" 

Drawing on extended ethnographic fieldwork between 2014 and 2016, this paper investigates emerging forms of hacking and entrepreneurial development in Mexico. To understand how hackathons, tech startups, and co-working spaces have become part of the national imaginary for rethinking Mexico, I first provide political and economic context.  As research participants tease out the tensions between being-made and self-making, they learn to fill an overarching neoliberal agenda with substance, meaning, and materiality. I show how young people attend hackathons and hone their coding skills at co-working spaces in Mexico City and in Xalapa, as they hack away to build solidarity and find the “coding bliss,” the affective dimension one encounters when creating beautiful code. As participants navigate the seemingly contradictory domains of hacking and entrepreneurship, “hacking” emerges as a way to make sense of their future livelihoods in a precarious state and economy, as a way to exist in a system where things just don’t seem to work, and as a way to let the “code work” intervene in narratives that have only delivered false hopes. As hackathons continue to proliferate across the globe, promising to turn anyone into a “hacker,” I propose that the emergence of the hacker as a subject position indexes a particular mode of orienting toward the world in contemporary society.

Jen Smith | "The Harriman Alaska Expedition of 1899: Race, Space, and Edward Curtis' Photography" 

The Harriman Alaska Expedition (HAE) of 1899 was an academic pilgrimage of the era’s predominant intellectuals, including John Muir, Edward Curtis, and George Bird Grinnell. The team of scientists and cultural critics toured the Alaskan coast and collected over 12 volumes of data, maps, photographs and drawings. I do close readings of Curtis’s photography to demonstrate the co-emergent traditions of anthropology and natural history as they are manifested in Alaska at the turn of the century. I argue that the undecided legal status of those indigenous to Alaska precipitated unprecedented interpretations of land in American history and created the unique status of Alaska as it is produced in representation and materially. In this way, I demonstrate how colonial definitions of land and race are co-constituted.

Wildavsky Conference Room, ISSI, 2538 Channing Way

 

FALL 2016

Wednesday, September 28

12:00-1:30 PM

Crossing Paths: Graduate and Undergraduate Exchanges of Indigenous Research

Remembering Indigeneity: Colonial Displacements and the Art of Resistance

Sarah Whitt, "Creative Offering: Poetics, Re-membering, Meaning-Making"

Alan Pelaez Lopez, "(Re)membering Home Through Jewelry"

Co-sponsored by the American Indian Graduate Student Association, the American Indian Graduate Program, Native American Studies, Joseph A. Myers Center for Research on Native American Issues, Native American Student Development, the Native American Recruitment and Retention Center, Graduate Assembly and the ASUC.

554 Barrows Hall

Wednesday, October 5

4:00-5:30 PM

CRNAI Colloquia Series:

The Other Slavery: The Uncovered Story of Indian Enslavement in America

Andrés Reséndez, Professor, Department of History, UC Davis

This will be a presentation based on the author’s recent book about a system of bondage that targeted Native Americans, a system that was every bit as terrible, degrading, and vast as African slavery; and yet most Americans are not aware of it and do not learn about it at school. According to the author’s estimates, anywhere between 2.5 and 5 million Native Americans were enslaved throughout the Western hemisphere in the centuries between the arrival of Columbus and the beginning of the 20th century.  And, interestingly, in contrast to African slavery which targeted mostly adult males, the majority of these Indian slaves were women and children.

**Professor Reséndez’ book, The Other Slavery: The Uncovered Story of Indian Enslavement in America, will be available for sale and signing at this event.

Wildavsky Conference Room, ISSI, 2538 Channing Way

Co-sponsored by the American Indian Graduate Program, Native American Studies and American Indian Graduate Student Association

Wednesday, October 12

4:00-5:30 PM

CRNAI Colloquia Series:

“The Indian maiden is not allowed to pine in loneliness”: Ruth Kellett Roberts and the Yurok Club, 1928-1934

 Victoria Haskins, Professor, History, School of Humanities & Social Science, University of Newcastle, NSW, Australia

The remarkable story of Ruth Kellett Roberts (1885-1967) and her advocacy for the Yurok Tribe of Del Norte County on the Pacific northwest coast of California provides a fascinating insight into relationships between Indigenous and non-Indigenous women in the 1920s and 1930s, a time of rapid social change. The wife of the accountant of a salmon cannery at Requa on the lower Klamath, Ruth Roberts was befriended by local Yurok women, in particular Alice Spott, and quickly became a passionate supporter of the ongoing Yurok struggle for land and employment. Over the next two decades, until the closure of the river to commercial fishing, Roberts was a staunch advocate for the Yurok cause, utilising her connections with society women in the Bay area of San Francisco. In 1928 she formed a ‘Yurok Club,’ for the young Indian women whom she had assisted in finding domestic situations in the Bay. Her initiative would, however, bring her into direct conflict with the BIA Outing matron who oversaw the placement of other Indian girls in white homes in San Francisco and the Bay. In this paper, I reflect upon the ambivalent and complex nature of Roberts’ advocacy for the Yurok people through her involvement with Indian domestic employment, an engagement that highlights broader questions around the political significance and impact of women’s work in the home, in the modern settler colonial nation.

Wildavsky Conference Room, ISSI, 2538 Channing Way

American Indian Graduate Program, Native American Studies, American Indian Graduate Student Association, and Center for Race and Gender

Wednesday, November 16

12:00-1:30 PM

CRNAI Colloquia Series:

Research Justice: Methodologies for Social Change and Societal Transformation

Andrew Jolivette, Professor and former Chair, American Indian Studies Department, Affiliated Faculty, Race & Resistance Studies, Doctoral Program in Educational Leadership, Graduate Program in Sexuality Studies and Interim Executive Director, San Francisco American Indian Community Cultural Center for the Arts, SFSU

This talk examines how we can approach research from news ways that center collective responsibility and and shared ownership over the research process. In particular we will review the thinking behind the development of the book, Research Justice: Methodologies for Social Change and the influential work of Dr. Linda Tuhiwai Smith and Dr. Michelle Fine who are contributors to this project. Central to the presentation and discussion will be the work of the DataCenter, a grassroots community-based organization in Oakland where the term Research Justice was coined. 

Wildavsky Conference Room, ISSI, 2538 Channing Way

Co-sponsored by Center for Research on Social Change and American Indian Graduate Program, Native American Studies, and American Indian Graduate Student Association

Wednesday, November 30

12:00-1:30 PM

Crossing Paths: Graduate and Undergraduate Exchanges of Indigenous Research

Unsettling Domesticity: Native Women Derailing U.S. Indian Policy in the San Francisco Bay Area, 1911-1931

Marina Cuneo, Undergraduate, Department of Anthropology, UC Berkeley

Caitlin Keliiaa, PhD Candidate, Ethnic Studies Department, UC Berkeley

554 Barrows Hall

Co-sponsored by American Indian Graduate Student Association, American Indian Graduate Program, Native American Studies, the Joseph A. Myers Center for Research on Native American Issues, Native American Student Development, the Native American Recruitment and Retention Center, Graduate Assembly, and the ASUC.

Friday, December 2

3:00-4:30 PM

MNI WICONI (WATER IS LIFE): The Fight for Water at Standing Rock 

First-Hand Reflections On Health, Environment, and Native Rights

This informal slide show and discussion of health, the environment, and Native sovereignty will be led by UC Berkeley students, faculty and alumni who recently returned from Standing Rock, including Carolyn Kraus (Sault Ste. Marie Ojibwe; UC Berkeley-UCSF Joint Medical Program student); Zoila Lara Cea (UCB Native Studies Alumna); Marcelo Felipe Garzo Montalvo (cultural organizer, musician, dancer, educator and PhD Candidate in Comparative Ethnic Studies); and Seth Holmes (Associate Professor of Medical Anthropology and Public Health). 

**Refreshments will be served.**

Standing Rock is the location of encampments of an estimated 10,000 to 15,000 native and non-native people working with the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe to protect their clean water, ancestral lands (including burial sites), and treaty rights against the Sunoco-owned Energy Transfer Partners Dakota Access Pipe Line (DAPL).  The Army Corps of Engineers has issued an eviction notice to the encampments with a deadline of December 5th.  The Tribe does not plan to evacuate their ancestral and treaty lands.

Co-sponsored by American Indian Graduate Student Association, Native American Student Development, Joseph A. Myers Center for Research on Native American Issues, the UCB/UCSF Joint Medical Program, the School of Public Health Diversity Inclusion Community Equity Committee. 

 

SPRING 2016

Tuesday, February 23

12:00-1:30 PM

CRSC Colloquia Series, Co-sponsored by the Myers Center:

CANCELED IN SOLIDARITY: Urban Education on Indigenous Land 

Eve Tuck, Associate Professor of Critical Race and Indigenous Studies, Department of Social Justice Education, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE), University of Toronto, 

In solidarity with the AFSCME Local 3299 call for a speakers' boycott of UC Berkeley, Eve Tuck has decided to cancel her planned Feb. 23 talk on campus. Instead, Tuck will participate in a public conversation with Prof. Michael Dumas on settler colonialism, antiblackness and urban education to be held in the meeting space of the UAW. The public conversation will attend to issues of labor and land, and include a framing by Corrina Gould, Chochenyo/Karkin Ohlone, co-founder of Indian People Organizing for Change and Sogorea Te Land Trust.

New location:

UAW LOCAL 2865

2030 ADDISON STREET #640A

BERKELEY, CA 94705

Read more about the AFSCME Speakers' Boycott of UC Berkeley at this link:

http://www.afscme3299.org/2016/02/04/release-president-clinton-other-lea...

Wednesday, February 24

12:00-1:00 PM

American Indian Graduate Student Association presents:

Crossing Paths: Graduate and Undergraduate Exchanges of Indigenous Research

"Black Lives Matter Movement Meets the Sand Creek Massacre Memorial: The Indispensability of Anti-Blackness to US Settler Colonialism"

Sara Chase, PhD Student, Graduate School of Education, UC Berkeley

"Indian Child Welfare Act: Beneficial or Detrimental to Native Children and Families?"

Jo-Joe Lee, Undergraduate, Rhetoric and Native American Studies, UC Berkeley

554 Barrows Hall

Co-sponsored by Joseph A. Myers Center for Research on Native American Issues, American Indian Graduate Program, Native American Student Development, Native American Studies, Graduate Assembly

Wednesday, February 24

12:00-1:00 PM

ISSI presents:

Graduate Fellows Program Application Workshop

In its forty years of existence, the Graduate Fellows Program (GFP) has provided an interdisciplinary research and training environment as a complement to, and resource for, UC Berkeley graduate programs in the social sciences and professional schools. Over 150 UC Berkeley graduate students have completed their doctoral studies and gone on to distinguished academic careers that have significantly influenced their disciplines and fields on issues of social change and inequality.

In an expansion of the Graduate Fellows Training Program, the Joseph A. Myers Center for Research on Native American Issues will provide funding for one additional Berkeley doctoral student who has completed at least three years of graduate studies and whose research focuses on Native American issues in the US today.

GFP Training Coordinators, Dr. David Minkus and Dr. Deborah Lustig, will provide an overview of the application process, the criteria applied when evaluating applicants, and the content and organization of the Graduate Fellows Program. Attending the workshop is not required. For more information and to download an application visit here.

Duster Conference Room, ISSI, 2420 Bowditch Street

Co-sponsored by Joseph A. Myers Center for Research on Native American Issues

Friday, February 26

9:00 - 5:00 PM

UC Berkeley's Native American Student Development presents:

Third Annual Perspectives on Contemporary Native Issues Symposium: Traditional Knowledge in Contemporary Contexts

Keynote by Dr. Leroy Little Bear, University of Lethbridge

Multicultural Community Center. Learn more here.

Co-sponsored by Joseph A. Myers Center for Research on Native American Issues

Wednesday, March 16

4:00 - 5:30 PM

CANCELED IN SOLIDARITY:

In solidarity with the AFSCME Local 3299 call for a speakers' boycott of UC Berkeley, Jessica R. Cattelino has decided to cancel her planned March 16 talk on campus. 

READ MORE ABOUT THE BOYCOTT HERE.

Jessica R. Cattelino, Associate Professor of Anthropology, UCLA

Wednesday, March 30

12:00 - 1:00 PM

American Indian Graduate Student Association presents:

Crossing Paths: Graduate and Undergraduate Exchanges of Indigenous Research

554 Barrows Hall

Co-sponsored by Joseph A. Myers Center for Research on Native American IssuesAmerican Indian Graduate Program, Native American Student Development, Native American Studies, Graduate Assembly

Tuesday, April 19

4:30 - 6:00 PM

CRNAI Colloquia series:

Native Hubs: Culture, Community, and Belonging in Silicon Valley and Beyond

Renya Ramirez, Associate Professor, Anthropology, UC Santa Cruz

Most Native Americans in the United States live in cities, where many find themselves caught in a bind, neither afforded the full rights granted U.S. citizens nor allowed full access to the tribal programs and resources—particularly health care services—provided to Native Americans living on reservations. A scholar and a member of the Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska, Renya K. Ramirez investigates how urban Native Americans negotiate what she argues is, in effect, a transnational existence. Through an ethnographic account of the Native American community in California’s Silicon Valley and beyond, Ramirez explores the ways that urban Indians have pressed their tribes, local institutions, and the federal government to expand conventional notions of citizenship.

Professor Ramirez’s ethnography revolves around the Paiute American activist Laverne Roberts’s notion of the “hub,” a space that allows for the creation of a sense of belonging away from a geographic center. Professor Ramirez describes “hub-making” activities in Silicon Valley, including sweat lodge ceremonies, powwows, and American Indian Alliance meetings, gatherings at which urban Indians reinforce bonds of social belonging and forge intertribal alliances. She examines the struggle of the Muwekma Ohlone, a tribe aboriginal to the San Francisco Bay area, to maintain a sense of community without a land base and to be recognized as a tribe by the federal government. She considers the crucial role of Native women within urban indigenous communities; a 2004 meeting in which Native Americans from Mexico and the United States discussed cross-border indigenous rights activism; and the ways that young Native Americans in Silicon Valley experience race and ethnicity, especially in relation to the area’s large Chicano community. A unique and important exploration of diaspora, transnationalism, identity, belonging, and community, Native Hubs is intended for scholars and activists alike.  Professor Ramirez will discuss the theoretical frame of Native Hubs: Culture, Community, and Belonging in Silicon Valley and Beyond and a meeting between U.S. Natives and Indigenous people originally from Mexico in relationship to the concept of Native Hubs.

Wildavsky Conference Room, ISSI, 2538 Channing Way

Co-sponsored by the American Indian Graduate Student Association, American Indian Graduate Program, Department of Ethnic Studies, Native American Studies and Native American Student Development

Wednesday, April 27

12:00 - 1:00 PM

American Indian Graduate Student Association presents:

Crossing Paths: Graduate and Undergraduate Exchanges of Indigenous Research

554 Barrows Hall

Thursday, April 28

3:30 - 5:00 PM

ISSI Graduate Fellows Program presents:

Constrained Choices:  Stratification and Mobility in Education

Caitlin “Katie” Keliiaa, Ph.D. Student, Ethnic Studies, and Graduate Fellow, Joseph A. Myers Center for Research on Native American Issues, UC Berkeley

Yang Lor, Ph.D. Candidate, Sociology and Graduate Fellow, Institute for the Study of Societal Issues, UC Berkeley

with Patricia Baquedano-López as respondent, Associate Professor, Graduate School of Education, and Chair, Center for Latino Policy Research, UC Berkeley

Caitlin “Katie” Keliiaa | "Unsettling Domesticity: Native Women Challenging U.S. Indian Policy in the San Francisco Bay Area, 1918 – 1936" 

In Northern California’s San Francisco Bay Area, behind the façade of well-appointed homes lays a once thriving project of government assimilation. From 1918 to roughly 1946 the Bay Area outing program recruited thousands of Native women from U.S. boarding schools to work as maids in affluent homes across the Bay. In exchange for room and board and meager wages, Native women cooked, cleaned and lived in the private homes of their employers. Through this program, the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) pursued its goal of assimilation: to supplant Native values and traditions with western substitutes. The project of domesticity was a tool of the settler colonial project.              

This paper argues that Native women domestic workers negotiated and challenged federal assimilation strategies. I focus on the surveillance and monitoring of Native women and their choices and decisions. This paper exposes the settler colonial mechanics of the outing program while interrogating the following: within the confines of domestic labor, how did Native women comply, resist and negotiate their circumstances? How did Native women rework potential and possibility into these systems? How did they resist or unsettle the mechanics of federal Indian policy? I first historicize the program and then analyze the BIA’s Relocation, Training and Employment Assistance archival records as well as articles from the Berkeley Daily Gazette. These rich texts reveal a specific, localized rhetoric that sought to justify the control of Native women. They also demonstrate the subtle and overt ways Native women resisted and unsettled the policies meant to control them.

Yang Lor | "Interdependence and Independence: Narratives of Constraints and Autonomy in Decision-Making Among High-Achieving Students" 

Low-income, high-achieving students are less likely than their higher-income counterparts to apply to selective colleges. Most explanations have primarily focused on access to information. In doing, they draw upon a rational choice framework that views the individual as making decisions based on an evaluation of the costs and benefits of various college options. This framework neglects how individuals are embedded within social structures that may shape their decision-making beyond just that of access to information. Drawing upon 30 in-depth interviews with high-achieving students in the Bay Area, I find that low-SES students tend to apply to in-state colleges, specifically CSUs, UCs, and a couple of in-state private universities. Higher-SES students, on the other hand, are more likely to apply to out-of-state public and private universities, especially Ivy League and liberal arts colleges. I argue that the upbringing and experiences associated with students’ social classes shape the narratives they express regarding how much autonomy or constraints they perceive in making decisions about their choices of college. In discussing their upbringing and their future, higher-SES students present a narrative of autonomy about what they have done and where they can attend college. In contrast, low-SES students speak of experiences and anticipations that reflect a narrative of interdependence grounded in the mutual concern parents and children have for one another as the prospect of college looms. Whereas narratives of interdependence impose spatial constraints on the college choices of low-SES students, narratives of independence promote student exploration and curiosity of out-of-state environments, thereby opening higher-SES students to colleges across the country. 

Duster Conference Room, ISSI, 2420 Bowditch Street

Co-sponsored by Joseph A. Myers Center for Research on Native American Issues

Tuesday, May 3

12:00 - 1:30 PM

ISSI Graduate Fellows Program presents:

Community-Engaged Projects and Public Process in the Golden State

Heather Arata, Ph.D. Candidate, City and Regional Planning in the College of Environmental Design and Graduate Fellow, Institute for the Study of Societal Issues, UC Berkeley

Peter Nelson, Ph.D. Candidate, Anthropology and Graduate Fellow, Joseph A. Myers Center for Research on Native American Issues, UC Berkeley

with Victoria Robinson as respondent, Lecturer, Ethnic Studies and Director, The American Cultures Center 

Heather Arata | "Making Public Participation Meaningful: Assessing Twenty-Five Years of Community Strategies for Environmental Justice in Kettleman City, CA" 

For the past 45 years, state and federal laws have required government agencies to include the public in the permitting process of facilities that could have a potentially negative impact on human health. Although public participation is a legal requirement, not all participation processes are created equally. Meaningful public participation is more than a legal requirement; it is a way for community residents to engage with government agencies to ensure a fair and inclusive process. While this requirement of public participation is in itself a change for communities once marginalized from permitting decisions, many residents are unable to participate meaningfully.

Here the rural and unincorporated community of Kettleman City, CA, is used as a case study for examining community strategies for meaningful participation in permitting decisions. This study relies on planning and legal documents, participant observations of recent public meetings, and in-depth interviews with twenty-two community residents and government officials involved with public meetings. These meetings include the approval of Environmental Impact Reviews (EIR) for a hazardous landfill incinerator project in 1990 and an expansion permit for the same landfill in 2009, but community strategies opposing the public participation process began in 1988 and continued until the final permit was issued in 2014.

Participant observation at meetings and interviews with Kettleman City residents show opponents of the landfill projects have utilized a variety of strategies to support their meaningful inclusion in the two public meetings. While they used similar strategies with both meetings, some have proven to be more effective than others. While some strategies have supported the projects opponents' efforts to be meaningfully included, others remain limited due to the legal requirements of public participation procedures, the lack of representation on committees and in the government, and a lack of accountability at the county level.

Peter Nelson | "Decolonizing Archaeological Methodologies: The Making and Remaking of Research Practices with Tribal Communities" 

Archaeological research has traditionally been a top down scientific process of knowledge production with little involvement from the descendant communities whose cultural resources and heritage are under investigation. With the incorporation of feminist, postprocessual, postcolonial, and Indigenous theories in archaeology, the discipline has become more accessible and accountable to publics and communities outside of the specialists who conduct archaeological research. In this presentation, I will outline the approach to Indigenous archaeology that I developed in collaboration with the Federated Indians of Graton Rancheria for my dissertation research at Tolay Lake Regional Park. This approach involved establishing and adhering to core research values and working with tribal committees to ensure that the research is relevant and worthwhile to the tribe. I will show through this case how research that is co-produced with Indigenous communities can lead to richer understandings of the past and how the products of this research can positively impact the lives of many different peoples today.

 Duster Conference Room, ISSI, 2420 Bowditch Street

Co-sponsored by Joseph A. Myers Center for Research on Native American Issues

 

FALL 2015

Wednesday, September 30

1:00 - 2:00 PM

Crossing Paths: Graduate and Undergraduate Exchanges of Indigenous Research

554 Barrows Hall

Co-sponsored by American Indian Graduate Program, Native American Student Development, Native American Studies, Graduate Assembly, and the Joseph A. Myers Center for Research on Native American Issues

Thursday, October 1

4:00 - 5:30 PM

The Berkeley Food Institute presents:

Decolonizing Foodways Symposium

The Food, Identity and Representation Working Group at UC Berkeley and University of the Pacific Food Studies program invite you to participate in an evening of critical thinking and tasting at the Decolonizing Foodways Symposium. Understanding food as a site for de/colonial struggles and strategies in the ways it is produced, consumed, circulated, prepared, and represented within a transnational advanced capitalist economy, this interactive workshop grapples with what it means to liberate our diets from colonial relationships of production and consumption both in theory and in practice. Building off the work of scholar/activists Luz Calvo and Catriona Esquibel, authors of “Decolonize Your Diet: A Manifesto,” we explore and continue to question what the process of decolonizing foodways means. We ask, for example: How do we increase the vitality of oppressed and indigenous peoples, maintain the integrity of our ancestral traditions, and embrace food and ways of cooking/eating that resist subjugation and instead nourish our palates, bodies, and lives? How do we make sense of the different realities of lived food experiences across time and space, taking into account the influences of power and privilege? How might we think through the intersections of diaspora, colonialism, assimilation, generational differences, and food gentrification/cultural appropriation? Utilizing an intersectional, audience-participatory, and multi-sensory approach, this symposium will include a panel of activists and scholars and a freshly-prepared meal by local chefs that cooks up decolonizing possibilities.

This event is free and open to the public, however registration is required. Register and learn more here.

Co-sponsored by Center for Research on Social Change and Joseph A. Myers Center for Research on Native American Issues

Thursday-Saturday, October 15-17

30th Annual California Indian Conference

Time Again to Gather: Celebrating 30 Years of the California Indian Conference 

October 15 - California Memorial Stadium, UC Berkeley

October 16&17 - Boalt Hall, UC Berkeley

The California Indian Conference (CIC), inaugurated at UC Berkeley in 1985, is committed to the sharing and exchange of knowledge, scholarship, and issues of importance related to California Indians, past to present. The conference also supports the promotion of excellence in collaborative, multidisciplinary, cutting-edge scholarship in Native American Studies, anthropology, history, social and environmental sciences, and other disciplines. This year, we celebrate the 30th anniversary of the California Indian Conference by bringing it back to where it began in 1985. The University of California, Berkeley is excited to host this historic occasion.

The opening day of the conference (10/15) will be held at California Memorial Stadium. The following two days (10/16 - 10/17) will be held at the UC Berkeley School of Law in Boalt Hall. The conference program, schedule, and additional information about visiting the Berkeley area will be posted to the conference website as soon as these resources become available.

Accommodations & Travel

Hotels in the Berkeley area: click here!

Traveling to and around Berkeley: click here!

Keynote Speakers and Panels

Dr. Deborah Miranda

Chairman and Dr. Greg Sarris

CIC Retrospective Discussion with Past Organizers

Elders Panel Discussion

Register for and learn more about the conference here. Please send inquiries to caindianconference2015@gmail.com

Co-sponsored by the Joseph A. Myers Center for Research on Native American Issues 

Wednesday, October 28

12:00 - 1:00 PM

Crossing Paths: Graduate and Undergraduate Exchanges of Indigenous Research

554 Barrows Hall

Co-sponsored by American Indian Graduate Program, Native American Student Development, Native American Studies, Graduate Assembly, and the Joseph A. Myers Center for Research on Native American Issues

Thursday, November 5

3:30 - 5:00 PM

Crossing Paths: Graduate and Undergraduate Exchanges of Indigenous Research

554 Barrows Hall

Co-sponsored by American Indian Graduate Program, Native American Student Development, Native American Studies, Graduate Assembly, and the Joseph A. Myers Center for Research on Native American Issues

Thursday, November 12

12:00 - 1:00 PM

Sounding Musical and Cultural Competence in a Powwow Drum Performance Ensemble

Dr. John-Carlos Perea, Assistant Professor of American Indian Studies, College of Ethnic Studies at San Francisco State University

Dr. Perea is an ethnomusicologist whose research interests include the politics of noise and sound studies, urban Amerian Indian lived experiences and cultural productions, music technologies, recording and archiving practices, Native and African American jass Cultures, and the Creek and Kaw saxophonist Jim Pepper. In addition to his scholarly activities, Perea maintains an active career as a multi-instrumentalist and recording artist in the San Francisco Bay Area.

554 Barrows Hall

Co-sponsored by the American Indian Graduate Program, Native American Studies, and the Joseph A. Myers Center for Research on Native American Issues

Thursday, November 12

4:00 - 5:30 PM

Indigenous Peoples, Human Rights, and International Bodies

Robert T. Coulter, Executive Director, Indian Law Resource Center

For almost 40 years, American Indian nations and other indigenous peoples have organized, worked, and advocated inside the United Nations and other international forums to defend themselves and their cultures and to win recognition of their rights as distinct peoples.  Indigenous peoples fought and negotiated for more than 30 years to win adoption of the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples by the United Nations General Assembly, making historic changes in international law. Indigenous leaders also initiated on-going campaigns in many other international forms dealing with climate change, biodiversity and environmental protection, intellectual property rights, the rights of women, and many other crucial topics. Barely a year ago, they won major commitments from the United Nations to take actions to implement the UN Declaration at the UN World Conference on Indigenous Peoples. They are working today to put those commitments into action in the UN. In the Organization of American States as well, indigenous peoples are negotiating and winning an American Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, which is expected to be completed in 2016. In the view of some experts, advocacy in international fora may be one of the most productive means for defending and asserting the rights of Indian nations and tribes. The talk will survey what has been accomplished, what is being done now, and how Indian and Alaska Native nations can participate in this work.  Attorney Robert T. Coulter of the Indian Law Resource Center has been working in the United Nations and other international bodies since 1976, when he wrote the first draft of what would become the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

Wildavsky Conference Room, ISSI, 2538 Channing Way

Wednesday, November 18

12:00 - 1:00 PM

Crossing Paths: Graduate and Undergraduate Exchanges of Indigenous Research

"Blackfeet Water Rights Compact"

      Mistyne Hall, Undergraduate, Native American Studies

"Native Tags and Tagging Natives: Rethinking the Native Gang[ster] Stereotype"

      Fantasia Painter, PhD Student, Ethnic Studies

554 Barrows Hall

Co-sponsored by American Indian Graduate Program, Native American Student Development, Native American Studies, Graduate Assembly, and the Joseph A. Myers Center for Research on Native American Issues

 

SPRING 2015

Thursday, February 5

12:00 - 1:30 PM

This Is a Story about History: American Indians and U.S. Citizenship

K. Tsianina Lomawaima, Professor of Justice and Social Inquiry, School of Social Transformation, Arizona State University; Distinguished Scholar in Indigenous Education, Center for Indian Education, Arizona State University

Many people understand that U.S. citizenship is a fraught and complicated status, one that raises many questions: Who is? Who isn’t? Who might be? Who shouldn’t be? Who’s scary? Who’s safe? Where shall we begin in order to talk about the status of American Indians? not in 1492; or in 1620 – that’s much too long. We’ll start in 1924 (I am a historian, after all) because that’s the year Congress passed the American Indian Citizenship Act. And we’ll end, not with a date and not with answers, either, but with Dan Snyder and the Washington Redskins visiting Zuni Pueblo.

2515 Tolman Hall, UC Berkeley 

Co-sponsored by UC Berkeley Graduate School of Education 

Wednesday, February 19

12:00 - 1:00 PM

The American Indian Graduate Program presents:

Crossing Paths: Graduate & Undergraduate Exchanges of Indigenous Research

Please join AIGSA in showcasing graduate and undergraduate research from across campus!

Carolyn Smith, Anthropology, UC Berkeley: "Basket Weaving in Northwestern California during the 1980s"

Briana Surmick, Ethnic Studies, UC Berkeley: “The Rise of Diabetes in Urban Indian Communities: Oakland, CA"

Moderated by Dr. Darby Li Po Price

554 Barows Hall, UC Berkeley

Co-sponsored by American Indian Graduate Student Association, American Indian Graduate Program, Native American Studies, Joseph A. Myers Center for Research on Native American Issues, Native American Student Development, Native American Recruitment and Retention Center, Graduate Assembly, and the ASUC

Friday, February 20

8:30 - 5:30 PM

Annual Perspectives on Contemporary Native Issues Symposium:

Perspectives on Native Representations 

While the history between Native peoples and representations of identity projected upon them (having been replicated and reinforced in popular culture) is layered and complex, the rise of technology and social media has ushered in an era of accessible activism that pushes against this history. Native peoples across the world now have practicable, highly visible modes to express unique voices that challenge and redefine how Natives are represented both internal and external of their communities. Perspectives on Native Representations seeks to highlight the multiple contexts through which representations of Native communities, culture and individuals are being shifted and re-imagined.

Dr. Adrienne Keene, "Native Appropriations: Representations, Pop Culture, and Cultural Resistance in Cyber Space"

Migizi Pensoneau, "Bullets in the Front, Arrows in the Back: A Look at Humor and Imagery in Indigenous Media"

Matika Wilbur, "Changing The Way We See Native America"

Learn more here.

Anna Head Alumnae Hall, 2537 Haste Street

Sponsored by Native American Student Development. Co-sponsored by the Joseph A. Myers Center for Research on Native American Issues 

Thursday, February 26

12:00 - 1:30 PM

Education, Ethnic Studies and Justice in Arizona

Bryan Brayboy, Borderlands Professor of Indigenous Education and Justice, School of Social Transformation, Arizona State University

In Arizona and elsewhere, justice is a systematic struggle for recognition. Ethnic Studies programs were created, in Arizona, to provide a sounding board for youth and peoples whose voices are too often marginalized in classroom discussions and materials. Despite the high academic success rates of Tucson students enrolled in ethnic studies, these programs have been framed as dangerous and unproductive. Eventually, the courses were banned from the Tucson Unified School District. In this talk, I will reflect on the role of justice in creating, and later marginalizing, ethnic studies programs in Arizona, while contemplating the importance of youth, structures and social engagement.

2515 Tolman Hall, UC Berkeley 

Co-sponsored by UC Berkeley Graduate School of Education 

Thursday, February 26

4:00 - 5:00 PM

Graduate Fellows Training Program Application Workshop

In its more than thirty years of existence, the Graduate Fellows Training Program (GFP) at the Center for Research on Social Change (formerly ISSC) has provided an interdisciplinary research and training environment as a complement to, and resource for, UC Berkeley graduate programs in the social sciences and professional schools. Over 100 UC Berkeley graduate students have completed their doctoral studies and gone on to distinguished academic careers that have significantly influenced their disciplines and fields on issues of social change and inequality.

In an expansion of the Graduate Fellows Training Program, the Joseph A. Myers Center for Research on Native American Issues will provide funding for one Berkeley doctoral student who has completed at least three years of graduate studies and whose research focuses on Native American issues in the US today.

GFP Training Coordinators, Dr. David Minkus and Dr. Deborah Lustig, will provide an overview of the application process, the criteria applied when evaluating applicants, and the content and organization of the Graduate Fellows Program. Attending the workshop is not required. For more information and to download an application visit here.

Duster Conference Room, ISSI, 2420 Bowditch Street

Sponored by the Center for Research on Social Change

Wednesday, April 8

12:00 - 1:00 PM

The American Indian Graduate Program presents:

Crossing Paths: Graduate & Undergraduate Exchanges of Indigenous Research

Please join AIGSA in showcasing graduate and undergraduate research from across campus!

Robert Lee, History, UC Berkeley: "The Elephant in the Archive: Why settler colonial studies needs forensic accounting"

Zoila Adaljiza Lara-Cea, Native American Studies, UC Berkeley: “Exploring Effects of the 'Academic Banishment' of Different Thinkers"

Moderated by Amber Machamer

554 Barows Hall, UC Berkeley

Co-sponsored by American Indian Graduate Student Association, American Indian Graduate Program, Native American Studies, Joseph A. Myers Center for Research on Native American Issues, Native American Student Development, Native American Recruitment and Retention Center, Graduate Assembly, and the ASUC

Thursday, April 16

12:00 - 1:00 PM

Indigenous Territorial Rights and Environmental Protection Lessons from First Nation’s Victory over Mining Interests in British Columbia

Marilyn Baptiste, Xeni Gwet’in Nation 

Marilyn Baptiste is a councilmember and former chief of the Xeni Gwet’in First Nation. She led her community in defeating one of the largest proposed gold and copper mines in British Columbia that would have destroyed Fish Lake—a source of spiritual identity and livelihood for the Xeni Gwet’in. Baptiste is Winner of the 2011 Eugene Rogers Award for outstanding contribution to environmental protection.

Duster Conference Room, ISSI, 2420 Bowditch Street

Friday, May 1

11:30 - 1:30 PM

Center for Research on Social Change's Graduate Fellows Program presents: 

Reclaiming Spaces: Critical Processes of Healing, Teaching, and Acknowledgement

Jocyl Sacramento, PhD Candidate in Education and Center for Research on Social Change Graduate Fellow

Olivia Chilcote, PhD Candidate in Ethnic Studies and Joseph A. Myers Center for Research on Native American Issues Graduate Fellow

Mara Chavez-Diaz, PhD Candidate in Education and Center for Research on Social Change Graduate Fellow

with Nikki Jones, Associate Professor of African American Studies, UC Berkeley as respondent 

Wildavsky Conference Room, ISSI, 2538 Channing Way

Co-sponsored by the Joseph A. Myers Center for Research on Native American Issues

 

FALL 2014

Wednesday, September 17

4:00 - 5:30 PM

"Dancing Salmon Home" Film Screening and Discussion with Michael Preston

Michael Preston (Winnemem Wintu) is a recent UC Berkeley graduate who is featured in the film.

'Dancing Salmon Home' is a journey of loss and reunification, across generations and oceans, as the Winnemem Wintu tribe of Northern California journeys to New Zealand to meet their long-lost Chinook salmon relatives, which have been missing from their river for 65 years. Along the way, the 28 tribal members hold four days of ceremony beside New Zealand's Rakaia River, forging enduring bonds with the Maori people of the region, sharing a message of respect for the natural world, and launching plans to bring their salmon home. The film was released in 2012 and produced by Will Doolittle.

Power Bar Building, 2150 Shattuck Ave, 10th floor, Room 1019, Berkeley

Wednesday, September 24

12:00 - 1:00 PM

"Crossing Paths: Graduate & Undergraduate Exchanges of Indigenous Research"

Georgann Deantoni, "Charcoal Identification as a Means of Central California Landscape Reconstruction"

Olivia Chilcote, "The Status of 'Non-Sovereignty': Native California and the Federal Acknowledgement Process" 

Sponsored by the American Indian Graduate Student Association, co-sponsored by the Joseph A. Myers Center for Research on Native American Issues

554 Barrows Hall

Monday, October 13

9:00 - 5:00 PM

Indigenous Peoples' Day

Join us for a free day-long series of events, performances, and participatory activities.

9-10am--Indigenous Archaeology in Central California, with Peter Nelson

10-11am--Welcome and Introductions, with Corrina Gould and other guests and hosts

11-12--Hoop Dance and Cultural Presentation, with Eddie Madril

12-1-- Ixtlamachiliztli, with In Xochitl In Cuicatl

1-2-- Lunch (on your own)

2-3-- Maori Dance Wananga (Cultural Exchange), with Tracey Panek

3-4-- Language and Storytelling, with Vince Medina and Kanyon Sayers-Rood

4-5-- Closing, with Daniel Arizmendi

Please register here.

Co-sponsored by the Department of Theater, Dance, and Performance Studies, the American Indian Graduate Student Association, the American Indian Graduate Program, Native American Student Development, and Native American Studies.

Bancroft Dance Studio, 2401 Bancroft Way, Berkeley.

Wednesday, October 22

12:00 - 1:00 PM

"Crossing Paths: Graduate & Undergraduate Exchanges of Indigenous Research"

Jesse Fraire, "The History and Consequences of the Salt River Project"

Jen Smith, "Space and Nourishment: The Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act and Subsistence Economies"

Sponsored by the American Indian Graduate Student Association, co-sponsored by the Joseph A. Myers Center for Research on Native American Issues

554 Barrows Hall

Thursday, October 30

4:00 - 5:30 PM

"Archaeo-Legal Landscapes of Identity: Defining 'Indian' in a Post NAGPRA World"

Darren Modzelewski, Law Teaching Fellow, James E. Rogers College of Law, University of Arizona

Simply put, the archaeo-legal landscape is where law and archaeology intersect. This spans everything from administrative questions about compliance with the National Historic Preservation Act to the criminal prosecution of illicit antiquities dealers. Of particular importance for Native American, legal, scholarly, and activist communities is where and how archaeological models of cultural boundaries and the legal requirement of cultural affiliation found in the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act intersect to create Indian identities. How Native American identity is created in and through both archaeology and law highlights questions about the production of knowledge-power, indigenous human rights, and what can be done to reshape the current landscape.  

Co-sponsored by the Thelton E. Henderson Center for Social Justice and the Native American Student Development

Room 134, Boalt Hall, Berkeley Law

Wednesday, November 19

12:00 - 1:00 PM

"Crossing Paths: Graduate & Undergraduate Exchanges of Indigenous Research"

Elisha Flores, "Shifting Fire Regimes in CA Forests: Traditional Ecological Knowledge vs. Western Forest Practices"

Lindsay Holiday, "Impacts of Renewable Energy for Indigenous Nations: Comparative Case Study for the Canada, United States, and Australia"

Sponsored by the American Indian Graduate Student Association, co-sponsored by the Joseph A. Myers Center for Research on Native American Issues

554 Barrows Hall

Thursday, November 20

12:00 - 1:00 PM

“I Feel For You”: Trauma, Self-Determination, and Indigenous Feminisms’ Affective Response to State Violence"

Dian Million, Associate Professor, American Indian Studies, University of Washington, and author of Therapeutic Nations: Healing in an Age of Indigenous Human Rights

I consider Indigenism today as an active and affective political position for peoples across continents seeking self-determination. In the United Nations, in Human Rights forums, and in communities Indigenism is a powerful lived and felt movement for our times. At the same time, Human Rights as it is articulated at the international level relies very heavily on the discourses of trauma and restitution to enact “justice” for atrocities committed by states against stateless and Indigenous peoples. Indigenous feminisms now present a growing grass roots response to a normalized violence haunting the lives of Indigenous women, their families and communities. This is a movement that both utilizes the human rights discourse and counters it. Recognizing that violence against Indigenous women undermines any self-determination in practice, how are women both central to the discourse of "trauma" while opposing its assumptions as they struggle for social and economic health? What is an Indigenous Feminist response?

Co-sponsored by American Indian Graduate Program and Department of Ethnic Studies

554 Barrows Hall

 

SPRING 2014


Wednesday, January 29, 12:00 - 1:00 PM

"Crossing Paths: Graduate & Undergraduate Exchanges of Indigenous Research"

Taylorr Gray, English and Linguistics undergraduate student

 and Timothy PlainFeather, Master of Development Practice graduate student

Moderator: Lani Teves, Ford Foundation Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Ethnic Studies

Sponsored by the American Indian Graduate Student Association, co-sponsored by the Joseph A. Myers Center for Research on Native American Issues

 

Tuesday, February 11, 9:00 -6:00 PM

"Perspectives on Native Landscapes: Exploring Relationships Between Our Peoples and the Environment"

Video of presentations by Beth Rose Middleton, Josh Mori, and Daniel Wildcat available here. For more information, click here.

Sponsored by Native American Student Development. Co-sponsored by the Joseph A. Myers Center for Research on Native American Issues

 

Wednesday, February 19, 12:00 -1:00 PM

"Crossing Paths: Graduate & Undergraduate Exchanges of Indigenous Research"

Sheelah Bearfoot, Biology undergraduate student

and Peter Nelson, Archaeology graduate student

Sponsored by the American Indian Graduate Student Association, co-sponsored by the Joseph A. Myers Center for Research on Native American Issues

 

Thursday, February 27, 12:00 - 1:30 PM

"Evidence-Informed Culture-Based Interventions and Best Health Practices in Native Communities"

Dale Walker, MD, Professor, Departments of Psychiatry and Public Health and Preventive Medicine and Director, One Sky Center, Oregon Health and Science University, and  Patricia Silk Walker, PhD, Research Assistant Professor of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Oregon Health & Science University

Co-sponsored by California Pacific Public Health Training Center (CALPACT), UC Berkeley-UCSFJoint Medical Program, Department of Psychology

 

Wednesday, March 19, 12:00 -1:00 PM

"Crossing Paths: Graduate & Undergraduate Exchanges of Indigenous Research"

"The Colonial Schooling Dialectic and Educational Imaginations: Native American and African American Education in Counterpoint," Bayley Marquez, Graduate Student, Education:

and "Rewriting the Archive: Challenging the Gaps in the Archive through Poetic Resistance," Katie Keliiaa, Graduate Student, Ethnic Studies, and Vickie Garica, Undergraduate Student, Native American Studies

Moderator, Deborah Freedman Lustig, Program Director, Joseph A. Myers Center for Research on Native American Issues

Sponsored by the American Indian Graduate Student Association, co-sponsored by the Joseph A. Myers Center for Research on Native American Issues

 

Wednesday, April 23, 12:00 -1:00 PM

"Crossing Paths: Graduate & Undergraduate Exchanges of Indigenous Research"

Sibyl Diver, PhD Candidate in Environmental Science Policy, and Management

and Aja Conrad, 5th year in Native American Studies

Moderator: Shari Huhndorf, Professor of Ethnic Studies and Native American Studies

Sponsored by the American Indian Graduate Student Association, co-sponsored by the Joseph A. Myers Center for Research on Native American Issues

 

Wednesday, April 30, 3:30 - 5 PM

"Nutak - Memories of a Resettlement" -- Film Screening and Discussion

Colin Samson, Professor of Sociology, University of Essex

Co-sponsored by the Canadian Studies Program

 

Thursday, May 1, 4:00 - 6:00 PM

"Life on the Inside of Country"

Jessica Weir, Senior Research Fellow, Institute for Culture and Society, University of Western Sydney   
Sponsored by Center for Science, Technology, Medicine & Society. Co-sponsored by the Myers Center

 

Thursday, May 8, 12:00 - 1:30 PM

"Racial Stratification in Education: How Schools Construct Hierarchy through Representations of Asian American and Native American Youth"

"Asian Youth and Race-Making in an Urban School: Focus on the Institution, Teachers, and Staff" Yenhoa Ching, PhD Candidate in Education and CRSC Graduate Fellow

"The Stakes of the Game: Reading Race and Gender in Boarding School Newspapers, 1933-1947" Tria Andrews, PhD Candidate in Ethnic Studies and Joseph A. Myers Center for Research on Native American Issues Graduate Fellow

with Michael Omi, Associate Professor of Ethnic Studies, UC Berkeley, as respondent

Co-sponsored by the Center for Research on Social Change

 

FALL 2013


Wednesday, September 25, 12:00 -1:30 PM

Crossing Paths, Graduate & Undergraduate Exchanges of Indigenous Research

 Tria Andrews-- "The Politics of Love and the Politics of Blood"

James Barrios -- "Prop 39 and Energy Use in Schools Across California."

Sponsored by the American Indian Graduate Student Association. Co-sponsored by the Joseph A. Myers Center for Research on Native American Issues.

 

Wednesday, October 23, 12:00 -1:30 PM

Crossing Paths, Graduate & Undergraduate Exchanges of Indigenous Research

"Lakota Orthography, an Overview" by Tasha Hauff and Simon Gertler

"'Desarollo Para Quienes?' Maya Women's Resistance Against Megaprojects in Guatemala" by Zully Juarez.

 Sponsored by the American Indian Graduate Student Association. Co-sponsored by the Joseph A. Myers Center for Research on Native American Issues.

 

Thursday, November 14, 12:00 - 1:30 PM

Brown Bag Lunch Colloquium

"The Interface Between Native American Culture, Economic Growth and Institutions"

Duane Champagne, Professor of Sociology, American Indian Studies, and Law, UC Los Angeles

Economic development, and social change in general, is a multidimensional and institutional process. An argument is offered that the patterns of indigenous institutional autonomy, the presence or absence of market values and institutions, access to markets, and the constraints of external bureaucratic control play key roles in understanding the possibilities of sustained and beneficial market participation among American Indian nations. In the way of introduction, the arguments are traced through the literature and examples given from history and policy. A case study is provided which traces economic, cultural, and political change among the Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians.

Alumnae Hall, 2537 Haste St. (between Telegraph Ave. and Bowditch St.)

 

Wednesday, November 20, 12:00 -1:30 PM

Crossing Paths, Graduate & Undergraduate Exchanges of Indigenous Research

Gilbert D. Saenz - "Vision of Four Medicines: A Practical Approach"

Kevin Doxzen - "Micro-RNA in a Macro-World"

Sponsored by the American Indian Graduate Student Association. Co-sponsored by the Joseph A. Myers Center for Research on Native American Issues.

 

SPRING 2013


January 8-11

Native American Museum Studies Institute: A Professional Development Opportunity for Tribal Museum Professionals

The goal of the Native American Museum Studies Institute is to develop the capacity of tribal community members to conserve and revitalize tribal cultural heritage; foster tribal representations and partnerships; educate tribal and non-tribal communities through museum development and exhibits. Workshop topics include: collections management and cataloging; conservation/collections care; curation and exhibit design; educational programming; museum management; Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act; museum fundraising; tribal partnerships and collaborations with counties, states, and agencies.

Sponsored by: Joseph A. Myers Center for Research on Native American Issues, UC Berkeley; California Indian Museum and Cultural Center; Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology, UC Berkeley

Co-sponsored by: Center for Digital Archeaology, UC Berkeley; C.N. Gorman Museum, UC Davis; UC California Studies Consortium; University of California Humanities Research Institute

Participation is by applicaion only.  Applications are now closed.

Wildavsky Conference Room, ISSI, 2538 Channing Way, Berkeley

 

February 27, 12:00-1:00 PM

Graduate Fellows Training Program Workshop

Come learn about the application process for the Graduate Fellows Training Program offered by the Joseph A. Myers Center for Research on Native American Issues and the Center for Research on Social Change. Current UCB graduate students who will have completed at least three years of graduate studies by May 2013 and whose research concerns issues affecting Native American communities today are eligible to apply. Attendance at the workshop is encouraged but not required for applicants.

Duster Room, Institute for the Study of Societal Issues, 2420 Bowditch, Berkeley

 

Wednesday, March 13, 12:00-1:30 PM

American Indian Health Policy and Health Disparities

Dr. Donald Warne, Director, Master of Public Health Program; Associate Professor and Mary J. Berg Distinguished Professorship in Women's Health, North Dakota State University

Brower Center, 2150 Allston Way, Berkeley, CA

Video of the event is available here.

Co-sponsored by the Center for Public Health Practice, UC Berkeley

 

Thursday, April 25, 3:30-5:00 PM

Visions of Alaska Native Citizenship in the Twentieth Century

Jessica Bissett Perea, UC President's Postdoctoral Fellow, Department of Music, UC Berkeley

Thomas Michael Swenson, Assistant Professor, Native Arts and Culture, Arizona State University

with Shari Huhndorf, Professor of Native American Studies, UC Berkeley, as respondent

This panel explores the imbrications of indigeneity and citizenship in the years preceding the formalization of Alaska as a state in 1959. With few reservations or treaties, the Native people of Alaska faced a unique situation and responded creatively to the colonial project on their homelands and proximal waters. 

Wildavsky Room, Institute for the Study of Societal Issues, 2538 Channing Way, Berkeley, CA

Co-sponsored by Native American Studies, UC Berkeley

 

Friday, April 26, 6:00-8:30 PM

Decolonizing Knowledge: Towards a Critical Research Justice Praxis

Linda Tuhiwai Smith, Pro-Vice Chancellor Maori at University of Waikato

Michelle Fine, Professor at CUNY and Public Science Project

with Andrew Jolivette, Associate Professor and Chair American Indian Studies, San Francisco State University, as moderator

Join us for a conversation on community-based research within indigenous and people of color communities worldwide. Decolonizing Knowledge will be a critical site for cultural survival, revitalization, and sustainability. This event will recognize two signature moments in the struggle toward indigenous and Research Justice—the 2nd edition release and forthcoming anniversary of the publication of Linda Smith’s seminal work, Decolonizing Methodologies: Research and Indigenous Peoples, and the 35th anniversary of DataCenter.

First Congregational Church in Oakland

2501 Harrison St Oakland, CA 94612

Ticket Price: $15. Register here

Sponsored by: Public Science Project, URBAN at MIT, and DataCenter; Co-Sponsored by the Joseph A. Myers Center for Research on Native American Issues

 

Tuesday, May 7, 3:30-5:00 PM

Re(Claiming) Urban Space: Urban Parks and Food Access

Pam Mei Wai Graybeal, Doctoral Candidate in the Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management, and Joseph A. Myers Center for Research on Native American Issues Graduate Fellow, UC Berkeley

and Lisa M. Feldstein, Doctoral Candidate in the Department of City and Regional Planning, and Center for Research on Social Change Graduate Fellow, UC Berkeley

with Miriam Chion, Planning and Research Director, Association of Bay Area Governments as respondent

“Municipal Parks: An Environmental Justice Analysis of Conditions and Use in the San Francisco East Bay,” 
Pam Mei Wai Graybeal, Doctoral Candidate in the Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management, and Joseph A. Myers Center for Research on Native American Issues Graduate Fellow, UC Berkeley

Municipal parks with commonly shared design features are found in cities and towns throughout the United States. As public commons, they reveal a great deal about social values, norms, and power. This study utilizes an environmental justice framework and a modified System for Observing Play and Recreation in Communities method to evaluate park conditions and usage. Forty-nine parks, predominately less than seven acres in size, located in census tracts reporting populations at or above the California averages for Asian, African American, or American Indian residents in the cities of Richmond, Berkeley, and Oakland, California were visited at various times throughout the day and week. Observations confirmed previous studies that found predominantly sedentary uses with limited variety. Among adult and teen park users, there were fewer women than men, which also corresponded with previous studies in other cities. Most parks were underutilized. Access to sanitary infrastructure and drinking water was limited, as was access to non-stationary equipment and stationary equipment for adults. It is recommended that municipalities could address environmental inequalities and increase park usage and benefits for diverse female constituents by providing free or very low-cost culturally appropriate programming and equipment, enhancing sanitation infrastructure, and facilitating active transportation to/from parks. These enhancements could provide extensive benefits and address major social and environmental problems.

“Zoning and Land Use Controls: Beyond Agriculture,” 
Lisa M. Feldstein, Doctoral Candidate in the Department of City and Regional Planning, and Center for Research on Social Change Graduate Fellow, UC Berkeley

The location of retail food venues is generally considered to be a function of rational market forces. Food access is generally excluded from the bundle of goods for which governments are explicitly willing to intervene in market forces through land use controls. Indeed, the connection between land use controls and food is rarely considered outside of agricultural applications, including zoning, agricultural land trusts, the complexities of managing agricultural-urban interfaces and, increasingly, urban agriculture. Intentionally or not, however, zoning and other land use management tools have long affected the availability of food in urban communities, reinforcing or amplifying the creation of food deserts. Some jurisdictions have begun to recognize their power to direct food access through land use legislation, while others continue to treat such decisions as value-neutral. This essay interrogates food law frameworks by using several examples of land use policies, rules and laws in order to consider these questions: (1) To what extent has form determined function (land use law determined food access); (2) Is it appropriate for governments to use their land use authority to intervene in the retail food market; and (3) Given competing public policy considerations around this issue, should there be an expectation that food be treated similarly to housing, water, and other essentials in the “bundle of goods” in which government explicitly intervenes? The author invites consideration of these questions within the context of our rapidly evolving understandings of questions related to food and society, and of the role the legal and planning fields have to play within these debates.

Wildavskly Room, ISSI, 2538 Channing Way

 

FALL 2012


Friday, September 14, 4:40-6:00pm, Wildavsky Conference Room, 2538 Channing Way, Berkeley

"Sounding Traditions of Inuit Cosmopolitanism in ‘Flying Wild Alaska’"

Jessica Bissett Perea, President's Postdoctoral Fellow, UC Berkeley Department of Music  

In this talk Bissett Perea explores circuits of Inuit cosmopolitanism as represented through the soundscapes and imagery of the Discovery Channel’s documentary-style reality television series “Flying Wild Alaska,” (2011-2012). When compared to its counterparts (e.g. “Deadliest Catch,” “Ice Road Truckers,” and “Gold Rush: Alaska”), “Flying Wild Alaska” is notable for portraying the diversity and mobility of Alaska Native and Inuit cultures, in part through the show’s use of contemporary Inuit music as a backdrop to portrayals of modern life in the arctic. From professionalized traditional drumsongs to funk- and jazz-influenced “Inuit World Music,” the musicocultural analysis will illuminate the longer history of Inuit cosmopolitanism throughout the circumpolar region and make audible the literal and figurative histories of Native migration between rural and urban spaces.

Sponsored by the Department of Music; Cosponsored by the Joseph A. Myers Center for Research on Native American Issues

 

Thursday, September 27; Friday, September 28 -- 12:30-6:00pm; 9:00am-5:00pm, 100 Boalt Hall, UC Berkeley School of Law

Fall 2012 Symposium

"Heeding Frickey's Call: Doing Justice in Indian Country"

A few year before his untimely death the renowned Indian law scholar Phillip Frickey delivered a lecture citing the "failure of scholarship in federal Indian law to grapple with the law on the ground in Indian country" and encouraged his colleagues to educate a judiciary with little knowledge of Native culture.

This symposium will bring together tribal leaders, jurists, Indian law scholars and practitioners to highlight the challenges facing tribal communities today and to explore ways in which the legal academy can contribute to meeting those challenges.

Location: 100 Boalt Hall, UC Berkeley School of Law

For more a complete list of speakers and panels click here.

Registration is required. To register, click here.

Sponsored by the Thelton E. Henderson Center for Social Justice.

Co-sponsored by the Joseph Myers Center for Research on Native American Issues.

 

Thursday, October 25, 4:00-5:30 PM, Wildavsky Conference Room, 2538 Channing Way, Berkeley

"The Constitution of the White Earth Nation:  Conception and Ratification of a Modern Native Constitution in Minnesota

Gerald Vizenor, Distinguished Professor of American Studies, University of New Mexico, and Professor Emeritus, University of California, Berkeley

with Richard Hutson, Professor Emeritus, English, University of California Berkeley, as respondent

Wildavsky Room, 2538 Channing Way, Berkeley

Cosponsored by Native American Studies and the English Department.

 

Tuesday, November 13, 4:00-5:30 PM, Wildavsky Conference Room, 2538 Channing Way, Berkeley

"Three Bodies: Rethinking Environmental Health and Food Production in a Mohawk Community"

Elizabeth Hoover, Assistant Professor, American Studies, Brown University

with Louise Fortmann, Professor of Natural Resource Sociology; Rudy Grah Chair in Forestry and Sustainable Development, UCB, as respondent

Environmental health conditions tied to industrial contamination, as well as lifestyle related illnesses like diabetes, are two major health concerns facing many Native American communities.  One such community is Akwesasne, a Mohawk nation downstream from one federal and two state Superfund sites that has been the subject of over two decades of environmental health research.  In addition to fighting environmental contamination, Akwesasne has also been working to address growing rates of diabetes. This presentation draws on in-depth qualitative interviews with community members, health study participants and health care providers from Akwesasne, as well as environmental health researchers from the State University of New York at Albany to explore community reactions to the health studies and current health conditions in Akwesasne, and their suggestions for improvement. I adapt a model of three bodies to discuss how individual, social and political bodies describe levels of involvement brought into play by people to address both environmental health and conditions related to lifestyle.

Wildavsky Room, 2538 Channing Way, Berkeley

Cosponsored by Native American Studies and Environmental Science, Policy, and Management.

 

SPRING 2012


Thursday, April 26, 12:00-1:30 PM, Duster Conference Room, 2420 Bowditch St., Berkeley

"Cultural Identity and Economic Development in Two Native Nations"

Ricardo Huerta Niño, Doctoral Candidate, Department of City and Regional Planning, and Joseph A. Myers Center for Research on Native American Issues Graduate Fellow, UC Berkeley

and

Ryan Shelby, Doctoral Candidate, Department of Mechanical Engineering, and Center for Research on Social Change Graduate Fellow, UC Berkeley
with Tom Biolsi, Professor and Chair of the Department of Ethnic Studies, UC Berkeley, as respondent

“The Power of Culture in Community & Economic Development: Lessons from the Hoopa Nation”

This presentation examines community and economic development practices and conceptualizations in the Hoopa Nation of Northern California as a case study of the role of culture in development. After decades of failed federal policies, many Native Nations have achieved modest to remarkable success pursuing tribally-directed economic development projects. Despite the compelling nature of these success stories, these cases remain absent from key development literatures, including urban planning and international development. This study examines the relationship between culture and community and economic development in a Native American context. Drawing from a series of interviews with tribal leaders, development practitioners, business leaders, and tribal enterprise management, it explores the ways in which the conceptualizations, discourses and practices of Hoopa culture have been included in development projects and the ways in which these practices provide for greater efficacy in these efforts. I examine tribal cultural projects-- including language programs, revival efforts (ceremonies, practices and arts), and cultural spaces and institutions -- and how they have been conceived, perceived and implemented as part of economic development. I show the concrete ways in which “culture” can be an effective input for development, a mobilizing discourse, and both a means and an end to development goals.

“Cultural Sovereignty as a Framework for Sustainable Community Development within the Pinoleville Pomo Nation”

Currently, there is a shift towards cultural sovereignty as the framework for building and infrastructure designs within Native American nations. The optimal strategies and decisions vary with the social, geographical and economic conditions of each community, yet few building infrastructure projects take into account the local social performance metrics during the new product development phase. This paper describes a research partnership between the Pinoleville Pomo Nation (PPN) and UC Berkeley‘s Community Assessment of Renewable Energy and Sustainability team during the co-design and development of sustainable housing that embeds geothermal heat pumps, photovoltaic systems, as well as the long-standing culture and traditions of the PPN. This paper presents the co-design methodology created for this partnership, the PPN’s framework for sustainability, and the social performance metrics utilized by the PPN to develop sustainable housing that incorporates the latest sustainability best practices as well as reflects the long-standing culture and traditions of the PPN. This paper also presents lessons learned, relating to forefronting cultural sovereignty at the early stage of sustainable community based design project within Native American communities.

 

Thursday, April 19, 12:00-1:30 PM, Wildavsky Conference Room, 2538 Channing Way, Berkeley

"Changing Indigenous Political Action: From Rights to Governance, and Back"

Stephen Cornell, Professor of Sociology and of Public Administration & Policy, University of Arizona 

Over the last couple of decades, the focus of a good deal of Indigenous political action has changed from the effort to secure rights to the task of exercising those rights, from the fight for self-determination to the challenges of governance. This has been true not only in the United States and Canada but even in some places, such as New Zealand and especially Australia, where Indigenous rights are much less extensive than they are in North America. Indeed, in some areas, the predominant North American pattern—movement from the securing of rights to the tasks of governance—is being reversed, with Indigenous nations using the careful, sometimes stealthy practice of unrecognized governmental powers as a way of asserting or expanding rights. Drawing on cases from North America and elsewhere, this paper examines these developments, their results, and their prospects. 

Co-sponsored by the Native American Law Students Association and the Goldman School of Public Policy.

 

Friday, April 13, 1:00-7:00 PM, Multicultural Community Center, MLK Student Union Building

"No Desecration for Recreation"

No Desecration for Recreation brings multiple communities and minds together to educate and advocate against the destruction of sacred sites of Native American communities. The event will include a film screening of "In Light of Reverence" and a performance, Sihasin ("Hope" in Navajo) with Jeneda and Clayson from Blackfire.

The film "In the Light of Reverence" highlights three different sacred sites currently being abused and neglected and implores us to treat those sites with the respect that they deserve. This film sheds light on the difficulties Native American communities face in protecting their sacred sites. "The film documents obstacles to religious freedom for land-based practitioners, and impacts on sacred sites that range from mining and ski resorts to New Age practices and rock-climbing."

Blackfire is a band from the Navajo Nation. They are "comprised of two brothers and their sister Jeneda, Clayson and Klee Benally. Born into the heart of a political land dispute area on Black Mesa in the Navajo Nation, this family’s powerful music reflects the Hopes, Freedoms, and Barriers of today’s world. Blackfire’s style encompasses traditional Native American, Punk-Rock and “Alter-Native” music and bears strong socio-political messages regarding government oppression, relocation of indigenous people, eco-cide, genocide, domestic violence and human rights".

No Desecration for Recreation will be a unique and timely documentation of the pressing issue of the abuses of Sacred sites in Native communities, and performance, Sihasin, by Indigenous Activists and performers, Jeneda and Clayson from Blackfire.

Doors open for the film at 1:00 pm. Performance by Blackfire begins at 6:00 pm. 

Sponsored by Native American Student Development.  Co-sponsored by the Multicultural Community Center, the American Indian Graduate Program, the Corss Cultural Student Development, the Native American Recruitment and Retention Center, the Native American Law Students Association, the College of Natural Resoures, and the Joseph A. Myers Center for Research on Native American Issues.

 

Tuesday, March 6, 12:00-1:30 PM, Wildavsky Conference Room, 2538 Channing Way, Berkeley

"Contested Images, Contested Lands: The Politics of Space in Louise Erdrich’s Tracks and Leslie Marmon Silko’s Sacred Water"

Shari Huhndorf, Professor of Native American Studies, UC Berkeley
with Hertha Sweet Wong, Associate Professor in the Department of English and Chair of the Department of Art Practice, UC Berkeley, as respondent

What role does culture play in conflicts over territory, the enduring center of indigenous politics Although literary and visual representations have performed a crucial role in colonization, indigenous artists and writers have revised these representational conventions to contest colonial power and to support Native claims to territory.  This paper takes up questions about the connections between cultural representations and spatial politics through an analysis of two exemplary texts: Louise Erdrich’s novel Tracks (1988) and Leslie Marmon Silko’s Sacred Water(1993).  Tracks narrates the devastating aftermath of the 1887 General Allotment Act, which transformed reservation lands into private property, as it also engages a consequent conflict, one that waged as Erdrich penned the novel, surrounding the legality of land transfers on the White Earth Anishinaabe Reservation after allotment.  As Tracks scrutinizes the effects of colonial policies, it undermines capitalist conceptions of land and history that underlie dispossession. Silko’s Sacred Water extends this engagement with territorial conflicts by revising the conventions of landscape photography, a genre historically implicated in dispossession, to challenge notions of land as property.  At the same time, it conveys indigenous histories and meanings of territory that carry legal weight in contemporary regional disputes surrounding land and water rights.

Co-sponsored by the English Department and the Ethnic Studies Department.

 

Thursday, February 9, 12:00-1:00 PM, Duster Conference Room, 2420 Bowditch Street, Berkeley

Graduate Fellows Training Program Application Workshop

In its more than thirty years of existence, the Graduate Fellows Training Program (GFP) at the Center for Research on Social Change (formerly ISSC) has provided an interdisciplinary research and training environment as a complement to, and resource for, UC Berkeley graduate programs in the social sciences and professional schools. Over 100 UC Berkeley graduate students have successfully completed their doctoral studies and gone on to carve out distinguished academic careers that have significantly influenced their respective disciplines and fields on issues of social change and inequality. In an expansion of the Graduate Fellows Training Program, the Joseph A. Myers Center for Research on Native American Issues will provide funding for one or more Berkeley graduate student who has completed at least three years of graduate studies and whose research focuses on Native American issues in the US today. GFP Training Coordinators, Dr. David Minkus and Dr. Deborah Lustig will provide an overview of the application process, the criteria applied when evaluating applicants, and the content and organization of the Graduate Fellows Program. For more information and to download an application visit:http://crsc.berkeley.edu/graduate-fellows-training-program

 

Monday, January 30, 3:00-5:00 PM, Wildavsky Conference Room, 2538 Channing Way, Berkeley

Graduate Student Social and Networking Event

Please join us to meet:

-Joseph Myers, Co-Chair of the Myers Center
-Christine Trost, Assistant Director, Institute for the Study of Societal Issues
-Deborah Lustig, Training Coordinator, Myers Center

This event is open to Native and non-Native UCB graduate students in any department who are researching Native American issues.

Come network, learn about funding opportunities through the Myers Center, and sign up for informal discussions with our spring speakers: Shari Huhndorf (Professor of Ethnic Studies, UCB) and Stephen Cornell (Professor of Sociology and Public Administration and Policy at University of Arizona).

At the event, you will have the opportunity to practice describing your research interests.

For more information and to RSVP please contact Deborah Lustig dlustig [at] berkeley [dot] edu or 510 643-7238.

If you are unable to attend but would like to be affiliated with the Myers Center, please also contact Deborah.

 

FALL 2011


Wednesday, September 7, 2011, 9:00-4:00 PM, Clark Kerr Campus, Krutch Theater, Building 14, 2601 Warring Street, UC Berkeley

"A Century of Ishi: A One Day Conference Celebrating 100 Years of Ishi"

This one day conference honors the contributions of Ishi as an educator and cultural ambassador and is an opportunity to reflect on contemporary interpretations of his legacy and of the Native American experience in museums.

On September 7th, 1911, Ishi made an historic recording of the story of wood duck, a figure from Yahi folklore. This conference marks the centennial of that recording and seeks to update our understanding of Ishi. Through the presentation of contemporary research, including a new film about Ishi's life and the re-mastered sound recording of the wood duck story, this conference will provide an opportunity to revisit Ishi's well-documented qualities of compassion, integrity, superior intellect, curiosity and understanding.

Organized by the Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology and the Califonria Indian Musuem and Cultural Center. Co-sponsored by the Joseph A. Myers Center for Research on Native American Issues.

Clark Kerr Campus, Krutch Theater, Building 14, 2601 Warring Street, UC Berkeley

The conference is free of charge, but registration is required. Click here to register.

 

Wednesday, October 12, 2011, 12:00-1:30 PM, Wildavsky Conference Room, 2538 Channing Way, Berkeley

"From Blood to DNA, From 'Tribe' to 'Race': Science, Whiteness & Property"

This talk will compare symbolic blood as it has been used in 20th and 21st-century U.S. tribal enrollment with the more recent advent of DNA testing for enrollment. I briefly examine both "Indian blood" and "tribe-specific blood" and compare these concepts with that of the "DNA profile" that is increasingly used in enrollment in concert with existing blood rules. How might DNA testing influence how we understand "Native American" as a racial category? I argue that genetic practices are more likely to "racialize" Native American citizenship than are current blood rules alone, and this is more harmful to tribal sovereignty than are blood concepts of identity.

Kimberly TallBear, Assistant Professor, Environmental Science, Policy, and Management, University of California, Berkeley

with

Troy Duster, Silver Professor of Sociology and Director of the Institute for the History of the Production of Knowledge, New York University, and Chancellor's Professor, University of California, Berkeley, as respondent

12:00 - 1:30 pm

Wildavsky Conference Room, 2538 Channing Way, Berkeley

Co-sponsored by the Sociology Department and the Environmental Science and Policy Management Department.

To watch this talk online click here.

 

Thursday, November 17, 2011, 5:00-6:30 PM, 30 Stephens Hall

"Will the Real Indian Please Stand Up? Persistent Stereotypes of American Indians in Popular Culture"

With more than 4,000 films depicting American Indians in Hollywood films and in other forms of popular culture, the various images have been conflated to the generic "Indian." How can Natives resist and respond to the use of our images in fraternity parties, as advertising gimmicks, or to represent the most vilified terrorist? When Osama bin Laden was captured, it was reported that "Geronimo" had been found.  Professor Micco's lecture will focus on the misrepresentation of American Indian people and its relationship to academic achievement, self esteem issues, and protection of sacred ceremonies and traditions.

Melinda Micco, Associate Professor, Mills College, Oakland

5:00-6:30 pm

30 Stephens Hall

Co-sponsored by the American Indian Graduate Program, the Office of Equity and Inclusion and the Joseph A. Myers Center for Research on Native American Issues.

 

Thursday, December 1, 2011, 12:00-1:30 PM, Goldberg Room, 297 Simon Hall, Berkeley Law School

"Holding Our Own: Education Strengthens Native Communities and Individuals"

James Ramos was first elected to the office of chairman for the San Manuel Band of Serrano Mission Indians in 2008. In 2011, Governor Jerry Brown appointed Ramos to the California State Board of Education making Chairman Ramos the first California Native American to be appointed to the Board. He is co-founder of the cultural awareness program at San Manuel and serves as director of the California Indian Cultural Awareness Conference held annually at Cal State San Bernardino. Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger appointed him to the California State Native American Heritage Commission in January 2008. In 2010, Chairman Ramos was re-elected to the San Bernardino Community College Board of Trustees for a second term. Born and raised on the San Manuel Indian Reservation, Chairman Ramos earned a Masters in Business Administration from the University of Redlands.

James Ramos, Chairman of San Manuel Band of Mission Indians

12:00-1:30 pm

Goldberg Room, 297 Simon Hall, Berkeley Law School

Co-sponsored by the Graduate School of Education, the Ethnic Studies Department, the National Indian Justice Center, the Thelton E. Henderson Center for Social Justice, Native American Law Students Association, and the American Cultures Center.

 

SPRING 2011


Wednesday, February 9, 2011, 4:00-5:30pm, Wildavsky Conference Room (2538 Channing Way), UC Berkeley

"Open House at the Joseph A. Myers Research Center on Native American Issues"

The Institute for the Study of Societal Issues (ISSI) is pleased to announce the opening of the Joseph A. Myers Center for Research on Native American Issues. 

Please join us.  Meet scholars and students who are affiliated with the Center.  Learn about the Center's research and training programs and scholarly events planned for this semester.  Find out how you can be involved in building the Center.

Light refreshments will be served.

4:00 - 5:30 pm

Wildavsky Conference Room, ISSI

2538 Channing Way, Berkeley, CA

 

Wednesday, February 23, 2011, 12:00-1:00 PM, Archaeological Research Facility (2251 College Building)

"Constructing Native American Identities in the Context of the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act"

Archaeological models of cultural boundaries and the concrete legal structure of the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act have the shared goal of making objects from the past align with the contemporary Native American ethnic and political identities of the present. This process, and the complex interrelations between the field of law and archeology, highlight important and troubling debates about power, knowledge production, and indigenous rights. In this talk, I use an archaeologically, linguistically, historically, and ethnographically contested cultural boundary in the Delta Region of the Great Central Valley of California to explore 1) if it is possible to tease out cultural/ ethnic differences from the archaeological record, 2) how interactions across borders might be remodeled, 3) the effect archaeological interpretations have within legal contexts. The political and methodological issues associated with both anthropology and federal law lead to boundary models that are not only epistemologically and empirically inadequate, but reproductive of power inequalities between the state, academy, and indigenous populations.

Darren Modzelewski, Ph.D. Candidate, Department of Anthropology, UC Berkeley

12:00 - 1:00 pm

Archaeological Research Facility (2251 College Building), UC Berkeley

Sponsored by the Archaeological Research Facility, co-sponsored by the Joseph A. Myers Center 

 

Thursday, March 17, 2011, 4:00-5:30pm, Wildavsky Conference Room (2538 Channing Way), UC Berkeley

"Football Indian Style: The Carlisle Story"

By 1907, the Carlisle Indian School football team was the most dynamic team in college football; games between the boarding school and the nation's top collegiate teams usually ended in a victory for Carlisle. Coach Glenn Scobey "pop" Warner, Olympic Champion Jim Thorpe and other team champions invented modern football as we know it today. They pioneered the forward pass, the overhand spiral and other tactics that transformed the way in which the sport is played.

Learn more about Jim Thorpe and the other Carlisle athletes. Ms. Myers-Lim will discuss this little known era of sports history and the important contributions these legendary players made in changing both the game of football and federal Indian policy.

Nicole Myers-Lim, J.D., Staff Attorney, National Indian Justice Center

4:00 - 5:30 pm

Wildavsky Conference Room, ISSI

2538 Channing Way, Berkeley, CA

 

Wednesday, April 27, 2011, 4:00-5:30pm, Wildavsky Conference Room (2538 Channing Way), UC Berkeley

"Tribal Sovereignty in Modern America"

Joseph A. Myers, J.D., Co-Chair, Joseph A. Myers Center for Research on Native American Issues, Executive Director, National Indian Justice Center, and Lecturer in Native American Studies, UC Berkeley

& Kelly Myers, J.D., Associate Director, National Indian Justice Center, and Lecturer, Native American Studies, UC Berkeley

4:00 - 5:30 pm

Wildavsky Conference Room, ISSI

2538 Channing Way, Berkeley, CA

 

Joseph A. Myers Center for Research on Native American Issue
The Myers Center is part of the Institute for the Study of Societal Issues 
2420 Bowditch Street #5670
University of California
Berkeley, CA 94720-5670
TEL: 510.643.7237
FAX: 510.642.8674
crnai@berkeley.edu
 
 

 

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